Rants, Raves, & Random Thoughts

Shameless self-promotion of my writing skills or lack there of.

Thursday, September 01, 2005

Why is Mona Lisa smiling?

Where do we go from here? That is the question posed more than once in The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown. It is quite appropriate as I finished the last of his published works. Yes, I have officially read everything the man has written.

I liked the story. It had everything that drew me to Digital Fortress and then some. It was smart, funny and full of action. I love the light he sheds on the sacred feminine. The world is out of balance without it, but then I guess it just takes a quick look around to figure that out.

Robert Langdon finds himself wanted for murder. What was meant to be a night sharing drinks with someone he greatly admired quickly turns into a whirlwind race to find the Holy Grail and clear his name. What does one have to do with the other? I suppose you should probably read the book to find out. Who am I kidding? I am probably the only person who sees this blog that hasn’t read this before now.

Anyhoo, if you like a good thriller and wouldn’t be offended at the thought of Jesus having children, then I am pretty sure that you will dig this book.

7 Comments:

At 6:21 PM, Anonymous mtreiten said...

Ack. I had some serious issues with the writing and some basic research that he got plain wrong.

He has the whole issue with the hammer falling on an empty chamber in the prologue and then thinks about a clip on his belt. Doesn't work if you understand the difference between revolvers and automatics. I was willing to overlook this. Later, they observe important clues written in blood residue under a UV light. But later they go into a part of the museum where the forensic team hadn't been and shine UV light and see glowing blood. It doesn't work that way. You need the fluoroscein dye and peroxide.

Big deal, these are just details. Yes, but they are details that I know. It calls all of his other research into question. Sure it's fiction. But if it's totally made up, why should I bother with the veneer of 'this could possibly happen' which is vital for a novel like this. So I doubted all the things that I don't know about, which ruined the whole book for me.

 
At 6:39 PM, Blogger James Goodman said...

Lol! I almost mentioned the pistol discrepancy but decided against it. I hadn't thought about them using the UV light without the solution. I'm not sure why I didn't catch it, I watch CSI religiously. :)

I guess I enjoyed it mainly because I didn't approach it with the "this could happen" train of thought. I nodded at the facts that I have heard before and looked at the rest as just...entertainment. In the end, the story did entertain men.

Congrats again on the WOTF whirlwind. I hope to see you sometime this month.

 
At 7:55 PM, Blogger Breazy said...

sounds like an interesting read especially with the forensics , which is my favorite thing to read on . :)

 
At 4:34 AM, Blogger James Goodman said...

Have you read Dead men do tell tales?

That is a great forensics book.

 
At 5:52 AM, Blogger Masha said...

I actually didn't really like The DaVinci Code...but Angels and Demons was really good. He wrote it before The DaVinci Code, which makes you understand the main character better. And I just thought Angels and Demons had a better plot line

 
At 6:10 AM, Blogger bsoholic said...

I enjoyed The DaVinci Code, I too didn't go in to it with a 'this could happen' attitude. However, after reading Masha's and your views on Angels and Demons, I wish I would of read it first. Too late now, and either way I should go check out Angels and Demons anyway.

 
At 6:36 AM, Blogger James Goodman said...

Oh, absolutely check out Angels and Demons. Have you read Digital Fotress yet? IMHO, it is the best book he has written to date.

 

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